7 Healthy fall foods and flavours

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7 Healthy fall foods and flavours

Fall is such a magical time. I love how mother nature can create such beauty with the colors, smells and surrounds that we live in. It has inspired me to create this blog about Fall Foods and Flavours.

Its the perfect time to wear a big cozy sweater, a cute scarf, and leggings and go for a walk on the trail. We are so lucky to have many trails and conservation areas located within a short drive of my home.  The air is crisp, a light frost may have fallen the night before and the bright colors of Auburn, reds, oranges, yellows, browns, and green make up the skyline.

Saturday mornings you’ll find the local farmers market busy with fresh local produce, fresh baking, and craft tables.  You will find bountiful amounts of local harvest in an array of colors and varieties.  Here are some of my favorite fall foods and flavors and the health benefits of each.

 

Roasted Sweet Potato: Whole Foods considers sweet potatoes one of the healthiest vegetables we eat.

There are loads of vitamins in a sweet potato, to name a few you’ll find, Vitamins B6, Potassium, Iron, magnesium and vitamin D.  Sweet potatoes are known to support the immune system which makes them a great thing to eat during the cold and flu season.  Another added bonus is that the sweet potato won’t cause a sugar spike, the natural sugars are slow releasing.  There are a variety of ways you can include sweet potatoes in your meals.  Most commonly used would be baked and Roasted. You could also try Pureed in a soup, Grilled on the BBQ. 

 

 

Apples:  Did you know there are 7500 varieties of apples grown throughout the world? 2500 varieties are grown in North America. The most purchased apple is the Red Delicious apple, Followed by the McIntosh, Gala and Granny Smith varieties of apples.  Apples are also very versatile. you can eat them right as they are, Baking all sorts of yummy treats with apples, Making applesauce, Apple butter, Apple juice are some of the most well-known uses. Apples have a lot of health benefits as well.  They have a high antioxidant content, A medium size apple roughly has 4G of fiber in it which will help keep you regular.

 

 

Cinnamon: I absolutely love the smell of Cinnamon. I like to make a chocolate protein coffee and then shake a little cinnamon on top. Another favorite thing I like to do is fill my crockpot with apple cider, a few cinnamon sticks and some sliced oranges and whole cranberries, the house smells amazing and its such a comforting warm drink.  Cinnamon is a great source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium so its no wonder the health benefits of having cinnamon can range from helping your Cholesterol, helping to control your blood sugars and has a natural food preservative element which helps prevent bacteria growth. 

 

 

Pumpkin: Not just for your Thanksgiving pie and Carving at Halloween. Pumpkin has so many other uses. Pumpkin Puree makes a great face mask. I kid you not, Its full of zinc and vitamins A, C and E, which is wonderful for your skin.  Fruit butter is being more popular and you” ll find many varieties at the Farmers Market. I’ve recently seen Pumpkin butter which is great with oatmeal and on a waffle. Roasting the pumpkin seeds was always something I looked forward to as a child with some salt and pepper.   The health benefits of pumpkins boast the antioxidant beta-carotene, which may play a role in cancer prevention. Potassium in Pumpkins can help play a positive role in your blood pressure. Zinc can be found in the pumpkin seeds.

 

 

Butternut Squash: It’s only been in the last 5 years that I’ve been eating butternut squash. I can’t ever remember having it as a child. I like it because it can be prepared very simply without too much labor-intensive work, pop it in the oven with some salt and pepper or a little Extra Virgin Olive Oil and your set. But if you would like to get creative with your butternut squash try it stuffed with wild rice and cheese, cube it up in your stir fry, or in a curry with apples and pecans. The health benefits of this big yellow veggie are endless, Fiber, of course, we have talked about with a few of our different veggies. Vitamin A is a huge immune boosting vitamins as well as helps to fight inflammation in the body which is found to be linked to some pretty scary diseases our population is facing. 

 

 

Walnuts: Walnuts are a fantastic match for grains. They work really well tossed on a couscous dish, sprinkled on a salad with a nice strawberry vinaigrette. Bakers will use walnuts in place of the more expensive pecan nut. Walnuts are one of the best plant sources of protein and are perfect for vegetarians. One-quarter cup of walnuts contains about 2.7 grams of the Omega 3 fatty acid and we all could use more Omega 3 in our bodies. This powerful fatty acid helps cardiovascular health and protection from Alzheimer’s disease.

 

 

Carrots: I ate so many carrots as a child I thought my skin would turn orange. My mother uses to boil carrots several times a week. she always told me they were good for the eyes and I have perfect vision so maybe she was right. I also loved to shreds carrots for my mum to make carrot muffins. I think I really just loved the butter on the muffin.  Either way, the health benefits from having a diet rich in this root vegetable are the high levels of antioxidant properties. Heart disease and High cholesterol are topics we hear a lot about and if you have carrots as a regular part of your diet this can help you lower these risk factors.

 

I hope this blog has inspired you to check out your local farmers market or grocery store produce sections for some of these fall flavors and you give them a try. You’ll be amazing at the aromas that fill your home, the flavors that tempt your taste buds and the health benefits your body experiences.

 

 

 

 

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